#Celebratelu: Celebrating a Smithling tradition: “Beckoning the Lovely”

Celebrate with Ruth Ayres Writes …. because we need to celebrate moments in our lives every chance we get.

At some point in each school year, most usually when we are nearing the dreaded PARCC or feel that winter will never end, we turn to Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s “Beckoning the Lovely” :

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The invitation to summon up “the lovely” is usually met with bemusement, the sixth grade “huh?”.  But, left to their own devices, my kiddos usually figure out unique and meaningful ways in which to do exactly that:

This one moved all of us to tears:

“Beckoning the lovely”. When I first heard the phrase, I was confused, how do you beckon the lovely? Well, I can now say I understand it. To me, beckoning the lovely means that we need to make the world lovely. And we need to do it step by step. Beckoning the lovely means being selfless and making someone smile. And after they smile, hopefully they will do something lovely too. The world lovely is such a beautiful word. It is the word that rings from people’s voices and sounds just right in people’s ears. But being lovely isn’t just talking, being lovely is doing.

For my act of loveliness, I decided to focus on my home life. Me and my dad had a talk about this project and I asked him if he had any ideas for lovely things I could do, and he told me this “if you want to do something lovely, focus on your home life. There are people all over the world that volunteer in so many places, and leave the people at home behind no matter how hard the life they lead is.” I thought about the people who have it hardest in my life. My brother for instance. His name is Uri, I talk about him a lot because he is the smartest, sweetest, most sensitively charming human on earth. Except, he has ADHD, ODD, and minor epilepsy. Sometimes, people judge him by his not-so-good moments and forget that he doesn’t know how to express his feelings. With Uri, it’s either he expresses his feelings too much, or doesn’t express them at all. He is older in his mind, and understands things that most sixth graders do not. But he has it hard in school, so I decided to take him for a day of “fun” with my babysitting money. We went to the library to read, got ice cream, went to the Francesca’s, and then I took him to the mall and we went to watch a movie. We are typically very close, but it was still an experience for us to talk with each other. He doesn’t hang out with many people, because most people don’t understand him. Even I sometimes have to remind myself that he is, after all, only human. I’m happy to do something lovely for him anyday! Attached is a photo of us at the park😂

This one was met with an ovation;

When I watched to video, I was very inspired to do something like Amy Krouse Rosenthal had done. I found it really interesting how her unique ideas brightened a total stranger’s day. This clip sparked my imagination and gave me the idea to try to brighten someone’s day, someone less fortunate than me. So I decided to make a lunch, write a note and give it to a homeless person (i gave the stuff to my Mom who works in the city to give to the person). I got this idea because I have always wanted to give back to the less fortunate than me and my Mom always tells me about the times she tries to help the homeless people. The bag contained….a peanut butter sandwich, a bottle of water and an inspirational note. When my Mom came home, she told me that the Man said “Thank you” and was very thankful. But I didn’t just stop there, I then made a list of 5 things that I will try to complete this week. Some of them where….Making a wood sculpture with my dad and putting it on display, breakfast in bed for my parents and helping my grandma.

Overall, I am very glad that we got assigned this because it gave me a chance to give back and I strongly urge others to do the same.

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There was so much to love about this one, so many layers of love and meaning, from a student who is rather shy and reserved:

My grandmother has always loved plants. Growing up in the same house as her, we kept rows and rows of plants behind our couch, and there was always something blooming in her garden. We even had cacti in our house. As in more than one. But there was something special about the way my grandmother raised plants. She found flowers that didn’t bloom, plants that should flower but didn’t, and yet she somehow found a way to make the plants that did not show any signs of beauty become even more beautiful than the plants that bloomed on their own.

I think that this origami flower represents the way that my grandmother treated all plants. The flower started of as a plain old cube, but turned into an alluring flower. Many people in the world are like my grandmother. They don’t see what is happening, they see what can happen, and that it what makes my grandmother special. Amy Krouse Rosenthal at the “Beckoning of the Lovely”, along with everyone there, acted similar to how my grandmother always does. They did not look at each other and think, “Wow, this person has no talent and can’t help us.” Instead, they thought, “Okay, we have all these people here, so let’s make something incredible.” My grandmother is like Amy Krouse Rosenthal. They looked at what they had, and made something worthy of being called a “Beckoning of the Lovely.”

Some of my kiddos did chores around the house, made dinner for grateful parents, and two paired up to make something for a very surprised me:

Screen Shot 2018-04-22 at 9.48.32 AMScreen Shot 2018-04-22 at 9.48.06 AMAs usual, I was touched and gratified by the way my kids take any teaching idea I may happen to have and fill it with their very own spirit.  To me, this is the magic of teaching, this is why we need to remember all through the teaching day that it is all about the kids.  This is why we must invest our teaching energies in what inspires and energizes our kids to beckon their own  lovely in their learning lives – meaningful work that engages them, and asks them to stretch their imaginations as well as their souls.

Even as I get ready to leave my classroom for good, I  know that every teaching day has been all about the beckoning of lovely: my beloved, always eager to try something new, students.  Today, I celebrate that.

 

3 thoughts on “#Celebratelu: Celebrating a Smithling tradition: “Beckoning the Lovely”

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